ecomii - a better way
November 22, 2017  |  Login

Cuban Crocodile
Crocodylus rhombifer

What Are They Like?

The Cuban crocodile is one of the most threatened crocodiles in the world. Adults typically measure about 11 feet (3.5 meters) in length, but have been known to grow to as large as 15 feet (4.5 meters) long. The body of the Cuban crocodile is covered with thick dark scales and its coloration is a pattern of black with yellow specks. Its tail is marked with dark colored blotches or bands. The broad, short head is equipped with very large teeth that are well-suited for crushing turtle shells. Cuban crocodiles lack toe webbing, which suggest that they spend more time on land than in the water.

Where Do They Live?

Cuban crocodiles are only found in two small areas of Cuba: the Zapata Swamp in the northwest and the Lanier Swamp on Isla de Juventud. They prefer freshwater swamps, similar to swamplands found in the Florida Everglades.

 
Did You Know?
Cuban crocodiles lack toe webbing, which suggest that they spend more time on land than in the water.

How Are Babies Made?

Every year between May and June, females will construct mound shaped nests and lay up to 30 - 40 eggs. Many of these eggs will not get the chance to hatch due to predators including other Cuban crocodiles.

What Do They Eat?

They prey on turtles, fish and small mammals.

 
Did You Know?
Cuban Crocodiles are known to leap from the water to catch prey sitting on overhanging branches.

What Do They Do?

Cuban Crocodiles are equally agile on land as they are in the water. Their powerful legs allow them to walk swiftly, and give them extra leaping abilities in the water. Cuban crocodiles are known to leap from the water to catch prey sitting on overhanging branches.

How Concerned Should We Be?

The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), which keeps a "Red List" of species in danger worldwide, lists the Cuban crocodile as "critically endangered." The two main threats are illegal hunting and hybridization with other crocodile species, namely the American crocodile.

What's Being Done?

Conservation measures have been taken, such as the development of protected areas and captive breeding programs for the Cuban crocodile. Further actions are needed to halt illegal hunting activity, which poses the most immediate threat to the crocodiles.

 

Cuban Crocodile Arrives in New Enclosure

 
 
 
 
ecomii featured poll

Vote for your Favorite Charity

 

 

 
 
ecomii resources
 
ecomii Tips Newsletter 

Sign up today to receive a weekly tip for living greener

 
Get in Touch

Got suggestions? Want to write for us? See something we could improve? Let us know!