ecomii food & health alternative blog

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Dog Goes Vegetarian, Loses 50 pounds

By Marie Oser, Managing Editor ecomii.com
June 24, 2015
File under: Healthy Eating, Pets, Vegan, Vegetarian, Weight Control

 

Travis Oser 13 Year old Vegetarian Labrador Retriever

People choose what they eat based on their belief system, which can include health, environmental, cultural or religious ideals; decisions that carry over to what they feed their family and their pets.

In addition to health, ecological and religious concerns, vegetarians and particularly vegans are repulsed by meat consumption and driven by compassion for animals, non-violence and economics.

Oftentimes the more distance we place between ourselves and anything the more objective we become. People sometimes choose a vegetarian lifestyle for one reason, health, religion, or animal rights and later connect with other reasons for doing so along the way.

A 2006 report from the National Research Council stated that a vegetarian diet as long as it contains sufficient protein and is supplemented with Vitamin D is healthy for dogs. Commercial dry food products provide the high levels of protein, …read more of Dog Goes Vegetarian, Loses 50 pounds here

 
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Magnesium-Rich Foods Prevent Sudden Death

By Michael Greger M.D. ecomii.com
November 26, 2012
File under: Health Concerns, Healthy Eating, Nuts, Seeds, Vegetarian, Whole Grains

Most men and women who succumb to heart disease die suddenly without any known history of heart problems. As noted in my three minute video How Do Nuts Prevent Sudden Cardiac Death?, up to 55 percent of men and 68 percent of women have no clinically recognized heart disease before sudden death.

They obviously had rampant heart disease, however it just wasn’t recognized until they were lying on a slab in the morgue. So if there was ever a case to be made for primary prevention, the determination to start eating healthier right now – tonight – before the symptoms of sudden cardiac death arise is it. Especially since that first symptom is often the last. So how do we do it?

Our story begins 43 years ago with a fascinating paper in the New England Journal of Medicine entitled, “Sudden Death and Ischemic Heart Disease: Correlation With Hardness of the Local Water Supply.”[1]

There appeared to be “an increased susceptibility to lethal arrhythmias [fatal heart rhythms] among residents of soft-water areas.” So maybe one of the minerals found in hard water is protective, but which one? Researchers decided to cut some hearts open to find out. …read more of Magnesium-Rich Foods Prevent Sudden Death here

 
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Karma Veg: Is being vegetarian a requirement for yoga?

By Jess Lewis-Peltier ecomii.com
December 27, 2010
File under: Healthy Eating, Vegetarian, Yoga

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So you’ve taken up yoga complete with your sticky mat, chanting and deep breathing. You’re feeling the healthy glow and are now thinking of taking it a step further by becoming vegetarian. After all, it almost seems requisite; but whether or not someone is required to be vegetarian when practicing yoga is the subject of much heated debate.

The simple answer is no, it is not a requirement. However, as each aspiring yogi/yogini delves deeper into yogic philosophy, it is difficult to ignore the principles that support this lifestyle. While listening to your body and its diverse nutritional needs is very important, you must also listen to your spiritual and karmic needs allowing those to be your compass in deciding what’s right for you.

Although yoga by no means forces the vegetarian lifestyle, there are many aspects of the philosophy that can, for some, ultimately lead to this conclusion. Many who practice yoga feel that the vegetarian lifestyle is one that is kind, clean and sustainable and most importantly adheres to the principals of Ahimsa and Prana. …read more of Karma Veg: Is being vegetarian a requirement for yoga? here

 
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A Mayonnaise-Free Coleslaw

By Kirsten Dirksen
March 16, 2010
File under: Healthy Eating, Produce, Recipes, Vegetarian

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Cabbage is a very underrated vegetable. It’s been ranked one of the 10 best foods you aren’t eating. It’s packed with vitamins, iron and calcium and it’s been shown to help fight cancer.

For cabbage novices, a head of this slightly bitter stuff might seem a bit overwhelming, but it doesn’t have to be that way. Coleslaw is a great way to dress it up. In case you’re turned off by the idea of a salad dripping in mayonnaise, this is a relatively fat-free alternative to that picnic-time staple.

Here is a recipe for a mayonnaise-free coleslaw that takes just about 10 minutes to make. …read more of A Mayonnaise-Free Coleslaw here

 
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Winter Spinach Salad

By Kirsten Dirksen
February 22, 2010
File under: Fruit, Healthy Eating, Natural Alternatives, Produce, Recipes, Vegetarian

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We change our wardrobes with the seasons, we should be changing our salad ingredients as well. Eating seasonally not only tastes better, but it requires a lot less energy to create.

In wintertime, instead of basing your salad on something light like a butter lettuce, consider something that weathers the cold climate, like endive, escarole or a more common spinach.

Once you’ve chosen your base leaf, move on to the add-ons. New York City-based chef Carlin Greenstein recommends building the salad around the green and in fall and winter, she likes to add a cooked element for those cold days.

Here is her recipe for a winter spinach salad complete with seasonal fruits (pomegranate, persimmon and pear). …read more of Winter Spinach Salad here

 
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An alternative approach to health, wellness and disease prevention. Marie Oser and her team of bloggers bring you creative natural solutions to issues affecting our health and wellbeing.

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